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Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

4 edition of The legacy of punishment in international law found in the catalog.

The legacy of punishment in international law

Harry D. Gould

The legacy of punishment in international law

by Harry D. Gould

  • 84 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Palgrave Macmillan in New York, NY .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • International law,
  • International offenses,
  • Punishment

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    StatementHarry D. Gould.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsKZ3410 .G676 2010
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24081116M
    ISBN 109780230104389
    LC Control Number2010007728

    The Legacy of Lynching, on Death Row a professor at Harvard Law School, have written a forthcoming book, “Courting Death: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment,” which explores the. The book’s innovative perspectives on the Bosman ruling makes it important reading for scholars, practitioners and policy-makers concerned with EU law and Sports law. With a foreword by Prof. Dr. Carl Otto Lenz, Advocate General at the Court of Justice in the Bosman-case.

    Raphael Lemkin (Polish: Rafał Lemkin; 24 June – 28 August ) was a lawyer of Polish-Jewish descent who is best known for coining the word genocide and initiating the Genocide coined the word genocide in or from genos (Greek for family, tribe, or race) and Born: J , Bezwodne, Volkovyssky . Professor Antony Duff is a leading expert on the philosophy of punishment and is internationally recognized for his expertise in criminal law and its structure. He joined the Law School faculty as a tenured professor in and is also a professor emeritus in the Department of Philosophy, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland.

    Climate change presents one of the greatest challenges of our time, and has become one of the defining issues of the twenty-first century. The radical changes which both developed and developing countries will need to make, in economic and in legal terms, to respond to climate change are unprecedented. International law, including treaty regimes, institutions, and customary international law. the laws, we have to say that complying with and applying the international law regulations is an obligation for all states. But, unlike the internal law, in the international law there is no centralized coercion device. But this fact 1 D. Popescu, A. N ăstase, International Public Law, “ Şansa” Press and Publishing House,File Size: 99KB.


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The legacy of punishment in international law by Harry D. Gould Download PDF EPUB FB2

: The Legacy of Punishment in International Law (): Gould, H.: Books Books Go Search Hello Cited by: 2. Introduction. This book explores the evolution of international punishment from a natural law-based ground for the use of force and conquest to a series of jurisdictional and disciplinary practices in international law not previously seen as being conceptually related.

" The Legacy of Punishment in International Law interprets a significant transformation within ethical reasoning about war, the disappearance of the idea of punishment among states. It makes a valuable scholarly contribution not only on this specific question of punishment, but also to the larger discourse on rules and norms in the international : Palgrave Macmillan US.

The Legacy of Punishment in International Law Harry D. Gould The Legacy of Punishment in International Law illustrates how seventeenth and eighteenth century rationales for the use of force in support of piracy and colonialism have been transformed into progressive features of contemporary International Law.

" The Legacy of Punishment in International Law interprets a significant transformation within ethical reasoning about war, the disappearance of the idea of punishment among states.

It makes a valuable scholarly contribution not only on this specific question of punishment, but also to the larger discourse on rules and norms in the international system. The Legacy of Punishment in International Law.

[Harry D Gould] -- This book explores the evolution of international punishment from a natural law-based ground for the use of force and conquest to a series of jurisdictional and disciplinary practices in. In the post-Nuremberg era two of the most important developments in international criminal law are the International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR).

Created through UN Security Council resolutions, with specific mandates to prosecute those responsible for serious violations of international humanitarian law, the ICTY and the ICTR played crucial roles in the development of international criminal law. Book description. This book argues that accountability for extraordinary atrocity crimes should not uncritically adopt the methods and assumptions of ordinary liberal criminal law.

Criminal punishment designed for common criminals is a response to mass atrocity and a device to promote justice in its aftermath. This book comes to this conclusion after reviewing the sentencing practices of international, national, and local courts and tribunals that punish Cited by:   Asian Approaches to International Law and the Legacy of Colonialism book The Law of the Sea, Territorial Disputes and International Dispute Settlement Edited By Jin-Hyun Paik, Seok-Woo Lee, Kevin Y.

Tan. This book argues that accountability for extraordinary atrocity crimes should not uncritically adopt the methods and assumptions of ordinary liberal criminal law.

Criminal punishment designed for common criminals is a response to mass atrocity and a device to promote justice in its aftermath.

This book comes to this conclusion after reviewing the sentencing practices of international 3/5(1). The Metamorphosis of Punishment in the Law of Nations A dissertation presented by Bradley Alan Hinshelwood to The Department of Government in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the subject of Government Harvard.

The Theoretical Basis of Punishment in International Criminal Law By Dr. Farooq Hassan* I. INTRODUCTION S ince a number of activities have been declared international criminal wrongs by international instruments which envisage punish-ment for the wrongdoer.

While the list of such wrongs is still evolving, aCited by:   But inexecutions still took place in 25 countries, with the highest amount of executions in China, Iran, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and the USA.

Although there are a number of inconsistencies between the death penalty and international human rights standards, its implementation is not forbidden by universally binding international law.

Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Legacy of Punishment in International Law at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.5/5(1). Three international law issues relating to capital punishment are addressed in this chapter. The first concerns the tension between the reform of capital punishment, as international legal norms governing its practice become increasingly stringent.

The second considers the validity of a category of states described as de facto : William A. Schabas. is a platform for academics to share research papers. case studies for The Limits of Punishment project. She is a senior fellow in the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC.

She is an expert on international and internal conflicts and nontraditional security threats, including insurgency, organized crime, urban violence, and. Book Review. Publication Date. Publication Citation. 55 German Yearbook of International Law () Recommended Citation.

Waters, Timothy W., "Book Review. The Legacy of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia edited by Author: Timothy W. Waters. New Book: Tony Platt, Beyond These Walls: Rethinking Crime and Punishment in the United States, ().Overview below: Beyond These Walls is an ambitious and far-ranging exploration that tracks the legacy of crime and.

imprisonment in the United States, from the historical roots of the American criminal justice system to our modern state of over-incarceration.

Wheaton's Elements of international law. Elements of International Law, first published inis a book on international law by Henry Wheaton which has long been influential. This book was translated into many languages and became a standard work.

On his own merits Wheaton is clearly entitled to rank among the classics. International Law and Abolition of the Death Penalty William A. Schabas* I Introduction The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Universal Declaration), adopted Decemproclaimed that "[e]veryone has the right to life" and "[n]o one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment."'Cited by:   This book examines the relationship between international human rights discourse and the justifi cations for criminal punishment.

Using interdisciplinary discourse analysis, it exposes certain paradoxes that underpin the ‘International Bill of Human Rights’, academic commentaries on human rights law, and the global human rights monitoring regime in relation to the aims of punishment in Author: Adnan Sattar.International law's rich existence in the world can be illuminated by its objects.

International law is often developed, conveyed, and authorized through its objects and/or their representation. From the symbolic (the regalia of the head of state and the symbols of sovereignty), to the mundane (a can of dolphin-safe tuna certified as complying with international trade standards), international.