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Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

5 edition of New religious movements and rapid social change found in the catalog.

New religious movements and rapid social change

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Published by Sage Publications, Unesco in London, Beverly Hills, Calif, Paris, France .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Religions

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographies and index.

    Statementedited by James A. Beckford on behalf of Research Committee 22 of the International Sociological Association.
    ContributionsBeckford, James A., International Sociological Association. Research Committee 22.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBL87 .N47 1986
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxv, 247 p. :
    Number of Pages247
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2743393M
    ISBN 100803980035
    LC Control Number86060924

    Wuthnow, R. (). Religious movements and counter-movements in North America. In J. A. Beckford (Ed.), New religious movements and rapid social change (pp. Cited by: 6. The concept of "new new-religion" has been used by some scholars and journalists for a number of years 30 to indicate a new stage or phase of development among new religious movements, although opinions differ as to whether the concept is appropriate to characterize the most recent movements. And while the concept of "new new-religions" has not.

    THE VATICAN REPORT. SECTS OR NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS: A PASTORAL CHALLENGE. May 3rd, FOREWORD. In response to the concern expressed by Episcopal Conferences throughout the world, a study on the presence and activity of "sects," "new religious movements," [and] "cults" has been undertaken by the Vatican Secretariat for Promoting Christian Unity, the Secretariat . " Chapter 4 of Lorne L. Dawson, "Comprehending Cults: The Sociology of New Religious Movements," Oxford University Press, (), P. to Read reviews and/or order this book References which believe in cult brainwashing.

    New Hindu Religious Movements in Contemporary India: A Review of Literature New religious movements and rapid social change (). London: Sage Publications. This book containing nine. Barker, Eileen. New Religious Movements Their Incidence and Significance. In New Religious Movements Challenge and Response. Edited by Bryan Wilson and Jamie Cresswell. London, New York Routledge; 69 References (2) Beckford, James A. Chapter 2 A New Conceptual Framework. Cult Controversies The Societal Response to New.


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New religious movements and rapid social change Download PDF EPUB FB2

The twentieth century has seen a considerable and unexpected proliferation of new religious movements in many parts of the world, often associated with periods of rapid social change.

This volume - now available in paper - explains the development and characteristics of these movements comparatively and analyzes their outstanding features.

The contributors shows how rapid social change gives 5/5(1). The twentieth century has seen a considerable and unexpected proliferation of new religious movements in many parts of the world, often associated with periods of rapid social change.

This volume - now available in paper - explains the development and characteristics of these movements comparatively and analyzes their outstanding : Paperback.

Get this from a library. New religious movements and rapid social change. [James A Beckford; International Sociological Association. Research Committee ;] -- "The book shows how rapid social change gives rise to novel religious interpretations and how new religious movements, in turn, try to influence the process of change.

This analysis is illustrated by. xv, p.: 22 cm Includes bibliographies and index Religious movements and counter-movements in North America / Robert Wuthnow -- New religious movements in Western Europe / James A. Beckford and Martine Levasseur -- The development of millennialistic thought in Japan's new religions / Susumu Shimazono -- Social change and movements of revitalization in contemporary Islam / Saïd Pages: The twentieth century has seen a considerable and unexpected proliferation of new religious movements in many parts of the world, often associated with periods of rapid social change.

This volume - now available in paper - explains the development and characteristics of these movements comparatively and analyzes their outstanding features.

A new religious movement (NRM), also known as a new religion or alternative spirituality, is a religious or spiritual group that has modern origins and is peripheral to its society's dominant religious culture. NRMs can be novel in origin or part of a wider religion, in which case they are distinct from pre-existing NRMs deal with the challenges posed by the modernizing.

rows  A new religious movement (NRM) is a religious, ethical, or spiritual group or community. Buy New Religious Movements and Rapid Social Change 1 by James A. Beckford (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Brian Wilson argued that many religious and spiritual organisations operating in contemporary society do not fit into categories such as churches and sects.

This has led to the development of typologies of cults and other New Religious Movements. According to Roy Wallis () cults differ from sects in that they are individualised, loosely. A new religious movement (NRM) is a religious community or ethical, spiritual, or philosophical group of modern origin, which has a peripheral place within the dominant religious culture.

NRMs may be novel in origin or they may be part of a wider religion, such as Christianity, Hinduism or Buddhism, in which case they will be distinct from pre-existing denominations. An article on the categorization of new religious movements in U.S.

print media published by The Association for the Sociology of Religion (formerly the American Catholic Sociological Society), criticizes the print media for failing to recognize social-scientific efforts in the area of new religious movements, and its tendency to use popular or. publication of its sort, the Encyclopedia of New Religious Movements is a major addition to the reference literature for students and researchers in the field of religious studies and the social sciences.

Entries are cross-referenced, many with short bibliographies for further reading. There is a full Size: 4MB. NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS The history of religions is one of continual change.

Each religion changes over time, new religions appear, and some older traditions disappear. Times of rapid social change are particularly likely to spawn new religious movements, for people seek the security of the spiritual amidst worldly chaos.

In the periodFile Size: KB. A new religious movement (NRM), also known as a new religion or an alternative spirituality, is a religious or spiritual group that has modern origins and which occupies a peripheral place within its society's dominant religious culture.

NRMs can be novel in origin or part of a wider religion, in which case they are distinct from pre-existing denominations. Some NRMs deal with the challenges. Wuthnow, Robert (). "Religious movements in North America". in Beckford, James A.

New Religious Movements and Rapid Social Change. London: Sage/UNESCO. ISBN The original Golden Dawn was not always as serious as it should have been. Mathers was a clown, and Yeats was just a romantic trying to deceive himself. Most of. The contributors shows how rapid social change gives rise to novel religious interpretations and how new religious movements, in turn, try to influence the process of change.

$ $ The 60s Communes: Hippies and Beyond. New religious movements expanded in many nations in the s and s. Japanese new religions became very popular after the American occupation of Japan forced a separation of the Japanese government and Shinto, which had been the state religion, bringing about greater freedom of Scientology was founded in the United States and the Unification Church in South Korea.

[14]. Cults versus new religions is a matter of perspective, says Ori Tavor, a senior lecturer in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, who teaches a class on new religious movements.

“New religious movement” is a new term from academic discourse, and is applied to religious movements from the 19th century onwards. The relatively rapid social change that characterized the ‘s’ a s an era was also associated with increased int erest in new forms of religiosity.

Although alternative relig ions and. New Religious Movements and Rapid Social Change (, editor), published by SAGE Publications and UNESCO, ISBN ; Religion and Advanced Industrial Society () The Changing Face of Religion (, co-editor) Religion in Prison.

Equal Rites in a Multi-Faith Society (, with Sophie Gilliat) Secularization, Rationalism and. The new religious movements and the new social movements compared ’, Review of Religious Resea 3: –58 Hannigan, J. A.‘ Social movement theory and the sociology of religion: toward a new synthesis ’, Sociological Analy 4: –31Cited by: New Media and Religious Transformations in Africa casts a critical look at Africa's rapidly evolving religious media scene.

Following political liberalization, media deregulation, and the proliferation of new media technologies, many African religious leaders and activists have appropriated such media to strengthen and expand their communities and gain public recognition.Start studying Reasons for the appeal and growth of sects and cults, new religious movements and new age spirituality.

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